‘I would not have survived’: Stephen Hawking lived long life thanks to NHS

From The Guardian: Stephen Hawking’s robust defence of the NHS set the tone for the row to come. When the NHS was plunged into crisis14amid plans to privatise the service, Hawking lashed out at the politicians he held responsible in a 2017 speech at the Royal Society of Medicine. He blamed ministers for funding cuts, pay caps and weakening the service through privatisation. He saw it all leading to a “US-style insurance system”.

He singled out Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, for particular criticism. In arguing for a seven-day NHS, Hunt claimed that 11,000 patients a year died because of understaffing of hospitals at weekends. Hawking pointed out that of the eight studies Hunt had cited, four were not peer reviewed, and that 13 more that Hunt had failed to mention contradicted the view.

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6-month-old baby died after life-saving operation cancelled 3 times due to lack of beds

From The London Economic: A six-month-old baby girl suffering from a heart defect died after a life-saving operation was cancelled three times due to a lack of beds, an inquest heard.

Iris Ann Day was born with Down Syndrome and an atrio-ventricular septal defect –
– a hole in her heart which causes blood to flow around it.

The condition was discovered when her mother Hannah was 36 weeks pregnant, when doctors said she would need surgery at around three months old.

[Read full article on The London Economic…]

NHS considers launching Airbnb scheme to cope with bed shortages

From the Guardian: Patients recovering from surgery could be discharged from hospital to recuperate in private houses nearby as part of an NHS trial.

The scheme, which is being piloted in Essex, aims to tackle bed shortages and save money but has been criticised by medical professionals and social workers who warn it would give too much responsibility to untrained members of the public. Read more

Children waiting up to 18 months for mental health treatment

From The Guardian: Children with mental health problems are waiting up to 18 months to be treated, according to a government-ordered report, in an indictment of the poor care many receive.

A Care Quality Commission report into child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs) will warn that long delays for treatment are damaging the health of young people with anxiety, depression and other conditions.

Long delays are leading to some children starting to self-harm or fall out of education, couples breaking up and parents having to stop working so they can look after their child, the charity Young Minds said. Statistics show that one in five children referred for treatment in England cannot be seen by overstretched child and adolescent mental health services, and some families end up seeking private care.

“We regularly hear from parents who can’t get a referral, with their GP telling them to seek a referral via their school and vice versa. We also hear from parents who have been waiting for months for an initial assessment, and whose children’s conditions have got worse during that time,” said Jo Hardy, the head of parent services at Young Minds.

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You are a thousand times more likely to be killed by Tory Government cuts than by terrorists

There were 30,000 excess deaths in 2015, representing the largest increase in deaths in the post-war period, which included a large spike in January that year. Researchers exploring why concluded that failures in the health and social care system linked to disinvestment are likely to be the main cause.

#VotingToryKills #ToryAusterity: There were 30,000 excess deaths in 2015, representing the largest increase in deaths in…

Posted by Stop The Tories Channel on Monday, October 9, 2017

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NHS nurses are too busy to care for patients properly, research shows

From The Guardian: One in three hospital nurses are too busy to relieve patients’ pain, give them their medication on time or talk to them and their families, research reveals.

Fifty-three percent of nurses fear the quality of care patients receive is suffering because they cannot do everything they need to do during their shift, according to a survey of 30,000 nurses.

And nurses are being left responsible for the care of as many as 25 hospital patients at a time, even though official guidelines say that to ensure patient safety it should not be more than eight. Read more

Now NHS cuts are stripping basic medicines from the poor – Polly Toynbee

Polly Toynbee writes in the Guardian: “A creeping postcode lottery of cuts gradually erodes the ‘national’ in NHS. IVF, hip and knee operations are being cut back randomly in some regions. In some places patients can only get one cataract fixed: seeing with one eye is enough.

“Waiting lists for hospital care just topped 4 million people, waiting times lengthening as A&E admissions rise means fewer planned operations, with extreme variations by hospital. The NHS is ordered to cut an impossible£22bn by 2020 – but there is no national instruction as to what. Politically, it’s easier to leave local decision-makers to take the blame.
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Revealed: Damning Tory catalogue of child health failures and cancelled NHS children’s operations

From The London Economic: The Labour Party are set to reveal that over 12,000 surgical procedures on children and young people were cancelled in the previous year alone.

This represents an increase of 35 per cent in three years. These cancelled NHS operations include procedures for broken bones and treatments under anaesthetic.

One in five paediatric trainee positions are currently vacant even though trainees themselves report high levels of enthusiasm for the speciality.

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Sick patients dying ‘unnecessarily’ in NHS because of poor care

From The Observer: Some of the sickest patients that hospitals treat are dying unnecessarily because they receive poor care, blighted by shortages of staff and equipment, a new NHS inquiry has revealed.

A death rate of one in three among inpatients with serious breathing problems is already high by international standards, and is getting worse.

The analysis by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death of NHS services for those who receive non-invasive ventilation (NIV) treatment uncovered a series of major flaws in the care they received. It described its findings as “shocking”.

The growing numbers of patients who receive the treatment usually have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia or other conditions which mean they cannot breathe unaided. Despite their lives being at risk, the report judged that care was “less than good” in 80% of the 353 patients surveyed.

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Theresa May tells nurse she can’t have a pay rise

From The Canary: Watch Theresa May say to a nurse whose real wages are going down: “I’m being honest with you in terms of saying that we will put more money into the NHS but there isn’t a Magic Money Tree we can shake that suddenly provides everything that people want.”

Meanwhile, Britain’s richest 1,000 families are well on their way to tripling their wealth since the financial crisis, while austerity bites the rest of us. Since 2009, the top 1,000 families have increased their fortune by over 155%.

[Read full article with video on The Canary website…]

A paramedic takes to Facebook to share his experiences of the Tory NHS

As a paramedic I'm really concerned at what I see as a result of the current Conservative Party government. I see more…

Posted by Emergency Action. #GE17 on Thursday, June 1, 2017

Another Angry Voice: Why you need to speak to someone who works in the NHS

From Another Angry Voice: “I’m not asking you to believe what I write here (even though it’s all backed up with links to evidence). I’m not asking you to believe Jeremy Corbyn when he says that the NHS needs to be defended from the Tories with all of our might. I’m asking you to speak to someone you know who works in the NHS and ask them about a number of specific issues.

“Almost everyone knows someone who works for the NHS. Everyone knows someone who knows someone who works in the NHS. If you have to ask a mutual friend to introduce you to an NHS worker so you can chat about the issues facing the NHS, I’m sure they wouldn’t mind at all. They’d probably be very happy to meet someone who shows some actual interest in their work and working conditions. Read more

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